Tag: cozy

Book Review: The Secret, Book, & Scone Society by Ellery Adams

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“The Secret, Book, and Scone Society” by Ellery Adams is an absolutely wonderful start to a new cozy mystery series! The story is centered upon Nora, a woman with scars both physical and emotional. Nora runs a bookshop and often helps customers heal from emotional trauma by suggesting just the right mix of books. One such potential reader is found dead before he can enjoy his books, and Nora sets out to determine what really happened.

The mystery is well-plotted, with enough clues and information provided to the reader to keep things interesting, but never enough to make the answer obvious. Nora thinks things through and takes logical steps to solve the mystery, instead of bumbling around and occasionally coming across a clue (like so many cozy heroines are prone to do). Of course, this doesn’t mean that she never does anything dangerous or stupid! Nora’s flaws are actually what make the reader love her; perfect heroines get annoying quickly.

The book also shines in the area of characters and their relationships with one another. Despite running a successful business, Nora has kept herself fairly closed off from others. As the mystery unfolds, she finds herself drawing together a group of like-minded women with problems of their own. As the story progresses, each woman begins to share her secrets and find personal healing. I love the way that these personal journeys are woven into the mystery plotline, and look forward to watching the friendships deepen as the group goes on to solve future crimes (which will undoubtedly occur in their cozy town).

Honestly, I can’t say enough good things about “The Secret, Book, and Scone Society”. It has everything a typical cozy should (including a crew of very oddly-behaving cats), but brings so much more to the table. Nora’s character in particular has the potential for extensive growth and development in future installments of this series. The other regular characters (plus one mysterious newcomer) also have plenty of room to grow and provide the bases for more stories.

Overall, five chunks of the tastiest, sharpest cheddar available!Chewie.doodle

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Book Review: Edited Out by E.J. Copperman

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Edited Out” by E.J. Copperman provides a unique twist on the cozy mystery genre. The protagonist, Rachel Goldman, is a mystery author. The over-arching premise of the series is that a man claiming to be Duffy Madison, her main character, appears in her life. In addition to solving the current mystery in which she finds herself involved, Rachel must try to figure out who the man claiming to be a fictional character actually is, all while trying to finish writing her current book.

What makes this book so enjoyable is first person narrator Rachel. She tells the story, but also speaks directly to the reader, and she is hilarious! For example: “Women were not put on this planet to be buffers between men. It’s a side service we sometimes offer while we plot our takeover of the world. Go ahead. Assume I’m kidding.”

In addition to Duffy and Rachel, the minor characters are also well-drawn and full of potential. I look forward to the next installment in this series; I’m eager to see what mystery our main characters are confronted with next, to gather more clues to Duffy’s true identity, and to hopefully learn more about the backstories and personalities of Ben (police investigator) and Rachel’s father.

The story itself is well-paced and cleverly plotted. It is a bit reminiscent of old-school detective stories, as Duffy and Rachel interview witnesses, gradually gathering more and more information (and misinformation) about the case. I enjoyed this aspect of the book; in many cozies, the heroine spends most of the book going about her life, occasionally coming across some clues. In “Edited Out”, Rachel is actively (if reluctantly) trying to solve the mystery.

Another aspect of “Edited Out” that I found interesting was the information that Rachel shares about being a writer. During the course of the book, she talks about deadlines, editors, agents, writer’s block, and her writing process. This is never overwhelming, and the reader doesn’t feel like the book has suddenly transitioned from a mystery to “How To Be a Writer”. However, what Rachel shares about her career comes across as insightful and relevant.

Side note: Other reviewers have said that this book can be read as a stand-alone. I can’t honestly address this, as I had already read book 1, “Written Off“. That being said, I think that a reader could pick up “Edited Out” and figure out what was going on fairly quickly. However, I’d recommend starting with the first book, both for continuity of storyline and for the more detailed character development provided.

I highly recommend this book to fans of cozy mysteries. I also think that fans of traditional mysteries would enjoy this story, as it provides a significant amount of focus on trying to solve the crime. Anyone looking for something unique would also find “Edited Out” a worthwhile choice.