Month: March 2022

Book Review: The Last Speaker of Skalwegian by David Gardner

I have so many good things to say about “The Last Speaker of Skalwegian” that I’m not even sure where to start. How about this: I’ve already added this book to my list of nominations for my Top 10 of 2022 list. There are only four books on the list so far, so that’s saying something!

Why did I love “The Last Speaker of Skalwegian” so much? First, because it’s unique. I’m always drawn to books that offer me something different and unusual, and this one definitely fits the bill. It tells the story of Lenny, a quirky college professor who is helping his friend document the almost-dead language of the Skalwegian people. While this may not sound like a delightful premise for a novel, I can assure you that it truly is.

Lenny is the perfect character to headline the story. I loved every single peek into the inner workings of his mind that that author shared with us. His backstory is interesting, and I felt that it helped me understand the man Lenny has become by the start of the book. His development during the course of the story is interesting, and I was pleased with where he ended up. I adored Lenny so much that I’d happily read a sequel, even if nothing much happens in it. I just want to learn more about Lenny and his linguistics projects, present and future.

Other characters, particularly Daniella, Charlie, and Henri, add humor and life to the story. I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention The Widow Bahr and Angel Warrior/Warbler…this pair were both hilarious and (ultimately) quite useful. Of course, there were also the “love to hate” characters like Dean Sheepslappe, Luther, and Elspeth. Without them, there wouldn’t have been a story, and each brought their own special brand of dislike-ability to the table.

The story itself was wonderful. Although I would happily read about Lenny and Company in any scenario, I very much enjoyed the Skalwegian plotline, along with the question of Charlie’s inheritance and the various dangers that come into play for the characters. By the last few chapters, I knew I wouldn’t be able to put the book down until I knew how everything ended up. Thankfully, the author gave us a solid conclusion that left me feeling happy for everyone, but sad that the story was over.

I also enjoyed Mr. Gardner’s clever naming of certain characters, which called to mind the genius that is Jasper Fforde. Throw in some Forrest-Gump-ish moments where things happen around our hero to which he is mostly oblivious, and perhaps you can begin to understand why I was so delighted to have had the chance to read this book.

Five out of five chunks of the most perfect sharp Cheddar!

Book Review: Until Leaves Fall in Paris by Sarah Sundin

“Until Leaves Fall in Paris” by Sarah Sundin is one part historical fiction, one part romance, one part Christian fiction, and one part pure literary magic. The book tells the story of Lucie, a young women living in Paris during the German occupation of World War II, and Paul, an American businessman with a young daughter.

In the course of trying to navigate the occupation, Lucie buys a bookstore from Jewish friends who are fleeing the country and Paul runs an auto manufacturing company and deals with the Germans. These actions propel both characters toward a mutual relationship, and cause both to examine their personal faith and their definitions of right and wrong.

The novels truly shines in several areas:

  1. Character development: We learn a great deal about both Lucie and Paul, as well as Paul’s daughter Josie. All three are portrayed in great detail, which makes them feel like real people you (as the reader) could meet and interact with. I found myself genuinely wishing for happiness for all of them, and eagerly reading “just one more chapter” to see how the author would evolve their stories. One added note for Sarah Sundin fans: Paul played a smaller role in “When Twilight Breaks”, a book I also recommend.
  2. The romance storyline: While both Lucie and Paul had interesting individual storylines, it was magic when the two came together. Of course there are misunderstandings, as Paul is publicly working with/selling to the Germans, while Lucie is trying to help her Jewish friends. However, things are not always as they appear, and I enjoyed watching the two getting to know each other, realize that appearances can be deceiving, and growing closer. The slow-burn romance was absolutely believable, and a joy to watch unfold.
  3. The historical information: While I’ve read a lot of World War II fiction (and non-fiction), I had not come across a book that was directly focused on occupied Paris before. I learned a lot about what life was like for American expats, Jewish locals, business owners, and German military figures. All the information was shared as a natural part of the story and never made me feel like I was reading a textbook. What could be better than actually learning something while enjoying a great story?
  4. The faith element: Both Lucie and Paul are Christians. I liked how their faith guided their actions, and how they actively sought out God when circumstances grew difficult and they needed guidance. This story provides wonderful inspiration and support for Christians who are struggling with difficult circumstances, and a nice faith boost to those who aren’t.

All in all, this is a truly excellent book. Five out of five perfect razor-thin slices of mild cheddar!

Book Review: The Last Roman: Exile by B.K. Greenwood

I enjoyed everything about “The Last Roman: Exile”. It’s an exciting, fast-paced combination of thriller, historical fiction, and magical realism. Since I’m a fan of all of those things, this book couldn’t have been a more perfect choice.

The story toggles between two timelines. The present-day plot deals with main character Marcus and his partner Sam trying to thwart a centuries-old plot to wreck havoc on humanity. The historical timeline moves from Marcus’ mortal days and follows him through some key moments of his immortal life. Usually when I read a dual-timeline story, I find myself rushing through one to get to my preferred plotline. In this case, both timelines were so enthralling that I honestly couldn’t choose a favorite. I find myself looking forward to the next book in the series to see what happens in the modern-day crisis, as well as to learn more about Marcus’ past adventures.

Main character Marcus was given a detailed backstory, and lots of information to help the reader understand who he was, who he is today, and how that transformation occurred. His motivations are clear and the reader feels a true sense of who this character is. Minor characters added a lot to the story as well. I particularly enjoyed Sam, and the relationship between the two.

The historical story begins in Biblical times, and I appreciated the author’s use of religious people and events in the book. I enjoyed the unique take on what may have happened to people who had noteworthy interactions with Jesus, and what happened to some of those people after the Biblical events were over. Please note that this book is NOT to be read as a theological treatise. It is a “what might have happened if…..” exercise, not a suggestion of philosophical possibility.

All in all, I loved everything about it, and eagerly await the next installment.